Hopkinss unique literary style

The most glaringly obvious are the indentations which sometimes appear in the middle of his lines.

Hopkinss unique literary style

First published in Studies. Romantic poetry espouses an idealist view of language which assumes that the object is known as a category of mind, but by the time of In Memoriam in Tennyson was expressing deep anxiety about the total dissolution of language: An Ontology of Grammar The language of Hopkins's contemporary Swinburne serves to show how language had become radically unstable and tended to degenerate into sound; as Pound said, 'He neglected the value of words as words and was intent on their value as sound'.

Hopkins clearly recognized this problem and believed that other nineteenth century writers had dissolved the link between language and the world of objects, which are for him fixed and vital in themselves, and for which words are substitutes or equivalents.

Such a view of language insists, like the Presocratic philosopher Parmenides, on an intimate link between real being and language, on what Armstrong calls an 'ontology of grammar': As Nietzsche saw, when he asserted 'I feel we are not getting rid of God because we still believe in grammar'.

So in Hopkins the word is irreducibly concrete; it expresses the Scotist haeccitas or thisness of things; and it, Hopkinss unique literary style, in Hulme's phrase 'hands over sensations bodily'.

But Hopkins was also aware of the idea of language as arbitrary sign and, because of lack, anxiety, and desire, language is often threatening to break down in his poetry as in stanza 28 of The Wreck of the Deutschland.

The question of how language relates to 'physical' reality was not the only linguistic problem Hopkins faced.

In some Romantic poetry, syntax tended to become one damn thing after another and this resulted in a jejune fluency that could be exacerbated by rhyme. Consider, for example, the opening stanza of Wordsworth's poem 'The Daffodils': I wandered lonely as a cloud That floats on high o'er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host, of golden daffodils; Beside the lake, beneath the trees Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

Lifeless effusions of this kind, which hardly provid 'What Hopkins the Jesuit and Scotist needed, then, was to construct a style that would validate as living form the world of nature, of human beings, and of God. The style that Hopkins chose is unusual: In Hopkins this combination is what Russian formalism calls the dominant, defined by Jakobson as 'the focusing component of a work of art; it rules, determines and transforms the remaining components'.

Hopkins' originality here can be seen if we compare him to other poets: Milton used both Latin syntax and a Latinate vocabulary; Yeats used Latin syntax and a vocabulary that is both Anglo-Saxon and Latinate.

Hopkins' Greco-Latin syntax involves two main types of hyperbaton, 'a figure of speech in which the natural order of words or phrases is inverted, especially for the sake of emphasis' described by Longinus On the Sublime, p.

These are the use of embedded sentences in which one subordinate sentence is contained within another main sentence, and the placing at the start of a sentence of material that would normally come later. Hopkins' use of Anglo-Saxon words also involves syntactic devices. The pervasive use of asyndeton - a device that omits connecting words such as 'and' and 'but' - produces tremendous compression and energy from the Anglo-Saxon vocabulary, as does the use of new compound adjectives that often replace relative clauses.

The difficulties of Hopkins' poetry are largely stylistic; as he himself said. For part of what Hopkins does with language is much more akin to Shakespeare's practice than to Milton's: As Hollander says, 'The ear responds to the dimension of natural experience, the eye to that of convention'.

The first aspect of Hopkins' idiolect to be examined is his pervasive use of embedded sentences. Embedding is defined as 'the process of including one sentence within another; or a construction where this operation has taken place'.

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Embedding, then, involves the use of a matrix sentence, defined as a 'superordinate sentence within which another sentence is embedded'and another sentence surrounded by the two parts of the matrix sentence, with the result that the subject is separated from the predicate.

So in the sentence 'the car that was stolen is in the street', the matrix sentence is 'the car is in the street' and the embedded sentence is 'that was stolen'.

May 06,  · A definition for what is style in English Literature and why it is important. This article also provides quotes from authors about style in literature and information about the basic elements of literary attheheels.coms: 7. Nor do I attempt to locate Hopkins's poetic style in any literary tradition. Rather, I am interested in exploring his references to and use of nineteenth-century musical agogics-that is, to the widespread use of rubato, rhythmic flexibility, pauses, and accents that is char- acteristic of Romantic music. Hopkins's style must be viewed against the general nineteenth century background. Romantic poetry espouses an idealist view of language which assumes that the object is known as a category of mind, but by the time of In Memoriam in Tennyson was expressing deep anxiety about the total dissolution of language: 'For words, like Nature, half reveal / And half conceal the Soul within' (In Memoriam, V).

The effect of embedding on the readers is to postpone their ability to understand the sentence; it is only when the entire sentence is complete that the statements in it can be decoded.

In Hopkins' poetry embedded sentences usually elaborate on some aspect of what is contained in the matrix sentence.A unique literary style can have great impact on the piece in which it is used, and on the readers.

When authors write and put their ideas into words, they have many choices to make, which include: words, sounds, logic, sentence structures. Hopkins's style must be viewed against the general nineteenth century background.

Published by the Students of Johns Hopkins since 1896

Romantic poetry espouses an idealist view of language which assumes that the object is known as a category of mind, but by the time of In Memoriam in Tennyson was expressing deep anxiety about the total dissolution of language: 'For words, like Nature, half reveal / And half conceal the Soul within' (In Memoriam, V).

‘The Windhover’ was written by Gerard Manley Hopkins () in , but, like many of Hopkins’s poems, was not published until , long after his death. It’s one of his most widely anthologised poems and some analysis of it may help readers to appreciate it .

It features many unique stylistic and form choices that give it a complex voice. The most glaringly obvious are the indentations which sometimes appear in the middle of his lines. For example, “We’ll never have you said another child [sic].” The speaker’s use of an interruption in the middle.

In literature, writing style is the manner of expressing thought in language characteristic of an individual, period, school, The most important unit of meaning in every literary work is the paragraph. Although each sentence conveys a thought, a literary work is not just a sequence of, say.

Nor do I attempt to locate Hopkins's poetic style in any literary tradition. Rather, I am interested in exploring his references to and use of nineteenth-century musical agogics-that is, to the widespread use of rubato, rhythmic flexibility, pauses, and accents that is char- acteristic of Romantic music.

Hopkinss unique literary style
Style Examples and Definition - Literary Devices